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Tim Jones Peak Pictures


November 2014 – Medical Rescue on Tim Jones Peak

The stars aligned yesterday for a 61 year old solo hiker on Mount Seymour. While traversing the North aspect of Tim Jones peak, the subject slipped and took a significant 60 foot fall off of the trail. Luckily, a number of hikers who were on the peak of Seymour, noticed him (60 feet down a gulley) on their way out, and were able to contact 911 to activate BC Ambulance and North Shore Rescue. With less than an hour left of daylight, the reported injuries were dire and included a closed head injury.

NSR immediately scrambled Talon Helicopters, and initiated a two pronged response with our flight team (who met the helicopter at our Bone Creek SAR station) and ground teams (who went straight up to Mount Seymour). Talon Helicopter pilot, Jarrett Lunn was able to insert an advanced medical team, which included an NSR Emergency Room Doctor, via hover exit on Tim Jones Peak. This team quickly accessed the patient and treated him on site while the helicopter returned to base to rig for a longline rescue.

With just moments of daylight left, an NSR HETS technician was inserted to the scene where the patient was packaged and delivered to BC Ambulance Advanced Life Support Paramedics for transport to Lions Gate Hospital. This was a classic time compressed call, where life and death, were literally dependent on the skill and experience of our flight team, medical crew, and members. This individual sustained multi-system trauma and would likely not have survived a ground based evacuation or prolonged exposure to the elements. Good Samaritans, Remaining daylight, Helicopter Available, Physician Available, Experienced Flight Rescuers Available – The stars truly aligned.

First responders received a call that a hiker had fallen near Tim Jones Peak, on the North Shore, Saturday evening. Because the call came so late and the light was fading, they faced a tight timeframe to rescue the injured man.


October 2014 – Recent News

BC Parks and the BC Government have approved the placement of a memorial plaque, the building of a SAR helicopter landing pad, and the placement of a rescue cache at the summit of Tim Jones Peak. Construction is scheduled to begin in the spring/summer once the snow melts. When complete, there will be a dedication ceremony of the mountain top memorial. An amazing step forward in recognizing the contributions to our community (and the BC Parks system) by this dedicated volunteer.


Vancouver Sun Article

North Shore Rescue leader Tim Jones loved Mount Seymour — he walked his dog there, rescued hundreds of people there and died there — and now an online campaign has started to name an unnamed peak on the mountain Tim Jones Peak.

“We call that peak Second Pump. It doesn’t have a proper name but that’s how it’s marked on our maps,” said NSR member John Blown.

“But the next time we print our maps it’ll be marked Tim Jones Peak,” he said Thursday.

The movement to have the peak named after Jones — who died of a heart attack on his way down the mountain from the NSR cabin Jan. 19. — began online last week, said Blown.

“It didn’t start with us or Tim’s family. But we are supporting it,” said Blown who has been a member of NSR for 11 years.

“We’re not really sure who started it but there’s a site — Bivouac.com — which has all the hikes and names of peaks and someone has changed the name of Second Pump on Seymour to Tim Jones Peak.”

The website shows a picture of the peak and describes the second peak of Seymour as “the last peak before the main summit in a sequence of bumps … the trail goes over the ridge west of the summit. The north side of it is a steep somewhat exposed drop to the final notch between it and Seymour, the crux of a winter ski trip.”

The campaign to name the unnamed peak has taken off, said Blown.

“A number of outdoor bulletin boards jumped on it and started to push it.”

He said it is fitting as Jones led many rescue missions to save hikers trapped in and around Second Pump. (Vancouver Sun)

http://bivouac.com/MtnPg.asp?MtnId=17551

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